Case Stats

  • This gives referring lawyers and the outside world the exact same information we use in-house for quality control. Intakes need to be accepted / declined and cases need to be resolved! Justice delayed is justice denied.
  • Total Intake Contacts (11/2/20)    757
  • Total Intakes Declined (11/2/20) 574
  • All Intakes Under Investigation 49 (11/2/20)
  • Total Accepted/Filed Cases 11
  • Total Pending Cases 159 
  • Referred Cases from other lawyers state and nationwide 94%
  • Median Time First Contact to Decline 25 days (most cases are reviewed w/ an indication of merit within 72 hours)
  • Median Time First Contact to Accepted/Filed Cases 9 weeks
  • Median Time Case Filing to Resolution 1.8 years

Denis Aplicano vs. Ah Cheng Siew (U.S. District Court—filed August 17, 2020) Faxon Law Group filed a suit in federal court on behalf of a young Honduran man who sought employment in the U.S to escape threats of violence and intimidation only to be forced into slavery by his employer, Ah Cheng Siew, owner of Empire Szechuan in Bethel and Southbury, CT. For six years, the plaintiff—along with many other undocumented enslaved restaurant co-workers—lived in constant fear and subjugation until being liberated by law enforcement, including the FBI, as part of a large human trafficking investigation.

The nightmare began in 2004 when 19-year-old Denis Aplicano was hired as a busboy. He was told by Siew that he would be given a small monthly wage and would be required to live in Siew’s home, with several other undocumented employees, as well as Siew’s family members. Aplicano was put in a basement with four beds, one bathroom, and no locks for privacy. Throughout Aplicano’s six-year period of debt bondage, his movements were closely controlled and monitored by Siew and food was limited. Aplicano had nowhere to go and was repeatedly threatened by Siew to be turned over to the authorities if he complained.

In 2006, gang violence in Honduras increased and Aplicano’s parents’ financial difficulties were impacted by poor health. Feeling desperate to care for his family, Aplicano approached Siew for a loan to aid his parents. Once the small support loan was provided, Siew began withholding Aplicano’s entire salary as repayment—rendering Aplicano a slave. After approximately 1 ½ years of working without pay, Siew told Aplicano that his loan was not paid off, as it should have been by then, and now Aplicano owed him an amount much greater than the original amount even with interest. Again, Siew threatened to have Aplicano arrested and then deported if he did not fulfill this arrangement of forced labor. Aplicano was also subjected to other humiliating emotional and physical abuse, including forced massages, extra housework, and maintenance, to fulfill this “debt”.

Finally in 2010,  Aplicano was released from the defendant’s six-year enslavement and Siew was arrested for human trafficking and harboring undocumented immigrants. Faxon Law Group is representing Mr. Aplicano pro bono in order to obtain proper financial compensation for the many years of enslavement and humiliation he endured at the hands of Siew.

How to Use Case Builder

Case Builder contains two helpful categories: cases we are working on now and our past results. Case Builder is a novel concept. Our web designer said we should have this information fixed in a web page. We disagreed—thinking that just like our practice is always changing the case builder should be an ever-changing description of where we are right now—not last month or a year ago.

Current Cases

Past Results

National Board of Trial Advocacy

US News Best Law Firms 2017

Super Lawyers Top 50 New England Lawyers

Super Lawyers Top 10 Connecticut Lawyers

Martin Hubbell Peer Review Rated

CLTA Board of Govenors