Case Stats

  • This gives referring lawyers and the outside world the exact same information we use in-house for quality control. Intakes need to be accepted / declined and cases need to be resolved! Justice delayed is justice denied.
  • 2017 Intake Contacts 627 (as of 8/7)
  • 2017 Intakes Declined 578 (as of 8/7)
  • All Intakes Under Investigation 68 (as of 8/7)
  • 2017 Accepted/Filed Cases 25
  • Total Pending Cases 170
  • Referred Cases from other lawyers state and nationwide 94%
  • Median Time First Contact to Decline 25 days (most cases are reviewed w/ an indication of merit within 72 hours)
  • Median Time First Contact to Accepted/Filed Cases 9 weeks
  • Median Time Case Filing to Resolution 1.8 years

Doody, et. al. v. Laurence Knoll, M.D., et. al. (New Haven Superior Court – filed May 16, 2017)   The patient visited her primary care physician, Dr. Laurence Knoll, in West Haven, Connecticut, for an annual physical in December of 2012, 2013, and 2014. Each time, unbeknownst to her, lab test results revealed an obvious abnormality within the Compete Blood Count (CBC). For those three consecutive years, the defendant-doctor never notified his patient of these abnormal results, never referred her to a hematologist (a blood specialist) for follow-up, and never took any other action related to the abnormal results.  If he had done so, a hematologist quickly would have diagnosed her condition as “polycythemia vera” –  a treatable condition that causes over production of red blood cells.  The goal of treatment (usually basic blood transfusion) is to reduce the thickness of the blood and prevent bleeding and clotting problems.  If left untreated, polycythemia vera can be fatal. In August, 2015, the patient was admitted to Yale-New Haven Hospital with a number of symptoms – the untreated polycythemia vera (too many red blood cells) had been causing her blood to thicken and clot. Despite aggressive hospital intervention, the patient decompensated over the following days and died.  Autopsy identified the cause of death as “polycythemia vera leading to hepatic venous thrombosis leading to hepatocellular necrosis.” In other words, the patient’s undiagnosed (but otherwise treatable) condition caused her blood to thicken and clot to the point of obstructing veins in the liver and causing toxic injury leading to liver failure and, ultimately, death.  She was 64-years-old and is survived by her husband, Michael (executor of her estate) two children, and four grandchildren.

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How to Use Case Builder

Case Builder contains two helpful categories: cases we are working on now and our past results. Case Builder is a novel concept. Our web designer said we should have this information fixed in a web page. We disagreed—thinking that just like our practice is always changing the case builder should be an ever-changing description of where we are right now—not last month or a year ago.

Current Cases

Past Results

National Board of Trial Advocacy

US News Best Law Firms 2017

US News Best Law Firms 2017

Super Lawyers Top 50 New England Lawyers

Super Lawyers Top 10 Connecticut Lawyers

Martin Hubbell Peer Review Rated

CLTA Board of Govenors